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More monitoring coming for petroleum trade, following new "bad gas" claims

Despite having no evidence to corroborate reports of contaminated gas being sold in the petroleum retail trade, the National Compliance and Regulatory Authority and the Bureau of Standards Jamaica say they will increase monitoring of the sector.

They say this should give the public greater confidence in the integrity of the fuel supply.

In a joint statement on Monday, the agencies said they had not received evidence of “bad gas” being sold to motorists.

They said the Consumer Affairs Commission also had no reports in the last 90 days of vehicular damage as a result of contaminated fuel.

The Boards of the entities and other officials met on Monday to discuss the Gleaner newspaper report of bad gas being released to the market.

The agencies said consumers with complaints regarding contaminated fuel should immediately bring them to the attention of the Consumer Affairs Commission for a thorough investigation.

They said, as of September 2017, the amendment to the Petroleum Quality Control Act requires that all fuel must be certified by both entities before release into the trade.

The National Compliance and Regulatory Authority and the Bureau of Standards Jamaica say all gasoline retailers should request the Certificate of  Quality from the fuel supplier.  

 

                                                                                                                        



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