NWA to attempt reopening section of North Coast Highway which collapsed

Superintendent Dwight Powell, head of the Trelawny Police and Devon Simpson, a resident who experienced delays in town of Falmouth
An attempt will be made today to reopen the section of the North Coast Highway which collapsed on Wednesday, resulting in a major traffic pile up of traffic in Falmouth, Trelawny.
Stephen Shaw, Communication Manager at the National Works Agency (NWA), said temporary measures will be implemented to facilitate single lane traffic.
However, this is not likely to take place until Thursday afternoon.
The agency said persistent rainfall contributed to the section of the highway collapsing.
Brace for delays 
Motorists are being warned to brace for more chaos in Falmouth on Thursday as traffic is still being routed through the town following the collapse of the section of the North Coast Highway.
The affected section of road was closed to vehicular traffic Wenesday afternoon.
Concern is being raised that the traffic pile up will affect the tourism industry with two cruise ships scheduled to dock at the Port of Falmouth on Thursday.
Superintendent Dwight Powell, head of the Trelawny Police, said officers will be pulling out all the stops to ensure that traffic is properly controlled in the town, despite the likelihood of "severe challenges". 
He urged motorists to avoid travelling through the town.
Motorists were stranded in Falmouth on Wednesday evening into night.
RJR News spoke with Devon Simpson who was stuck for hours in the vicinity of the cruise ship terminal in Falmouth.
"We can neither enter or exit the town because of the high volume of traffic at the moment. I think if the police had moblised their team quicker, it could have mitigate (sic) the problem that we are experiencing now," he said. 
The police have reportedly been diverting some traffic through Hague scheme which is said to be moving more freely than traffic in the town. 

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